For those out of the loop, the nation of India has increasingly cracked down on porn. While it is not illegal to download it or watch it, it is illegal to produce, publish, or distribute. The Indian government has recently taken to blocking porn websites over the Internet, which is destined to be a losing battle as India, worldwide, ranks third in countries that consume porn. This is going to be an interesting fight to say the least.

But in the meantime, it’s not illegal to tell people how to find porn anyway, so: Hello, India, and welcome to the continued struggle for information freedom over the Internet! Now here’s your guide to fighting the system.

In the first place, as you find your favorite porn sites blocked, you might try slight variations on the original URL. PornHub.com responded to the recent ISP-level ban by bumping over to PornHub.net just for India. Other sites have re-uploaded under altered domains by adding one letter or numeral to their URL, so try them all.

Proxy websites are a popular blanket solution. Anonymouse, Whoer.net, Hidester, and Hide.me are all examples; you go to them and type in whatever URL you want, with the ISP only knowing you went to the first site. It’s like a browser within a website. VPNs are the next step up from this, being Vitual Private Networks which also cloak your destination from prying government eyes.

UC Browser is another option. This is a privacy-focused web browser which has means to circumvent server-level bans on certain websites, by sprouting to different DNSs.

Finally, there’s a massive gray market in offline pornography. Porn DVDs are trading at 30 Rs, and you can always have a friend with access simply dump a saved copy of material to a USB thumb drive. Torrented content is another option, as BitTorrent sites are mirrored all over the place and nearly impossible to thwart.

The good news is that the Indian government has, in fact, changed its mind on this policy before. Back in 2015, they lifted a previous ban against porn websites when they experienced a backlash exactly like the kind they’re getting now. In fact, the chief complaint against the previous porn ban was India’s telecommunications industry, with web traffic providers complaining they were losing business. So it may yet prove to be a second strike-out for social nannies in politics.